More Selenium4 Goodies

After my previous post on Selenium 4 Relative Locators, I further explored Selenium4 features and found a few more goodies in WebElement and WebDriver interfaces.

Element Screenshots

Yes, now we can capture screenshot of an individual element or group of elements. This is a very useful feature. I talked about capturing element screenshots in my Selenium Testing Tools Cookbook. However, the new feature added in Selenium 4 (alpha-3) is inbuilt and much simpler.

The WebElement interface now supports getScreenShotAs() method by implementing the TakesScreenshot to capture a screenshot of the element.

This method accepts the OutputType argument and screenshots can be captured as FILE, BYTES or BASE64 string.

Let’s try to capture screenshot of a link and the search box displayed on Google Search Home page:

2019-10-14_20-57-22.png


// find the Images link on Google Search home page
WebElement imagesLink = driver.findElement(By.linkText("Images"));

// take a screenshot of the link element
File linkScr = imagesLink.getScreenshotAs(OutputType.FILE);
FileUtils.copyFile(linkScr, new File("./target/linkScr.png"));

We can also capture a group of elements by taking a screenshot of the parent element. Here is a complete example capturing the Images link and the search box:

carbon (4).png

The new getRect() method

The new getRect() method is introduced in WebDriver interface which is essentially a combination of previous getSize() and getLocation() methods. Here’s a difference between previous methods and new the getRect() method which returns a Rectangle object:

carbon (5).png

New additions in WebDriver

In addition, to maximize() method, the browser window can now be made fullscreen by using the new fullscreen() method:

driver.manage().window().fullscreen();

A new parentFrame() method is added for navigating between frames.

driver.switchTo().parentFrame()

I’m not really sure if this is completely new feature (or maybe I’m too lazy to go through the changes) but we can now create a new empty tab or new browser window by using the newWindow() method.

driver.switchTo().newWindow(WindowType.TAB);
driver.switchTo().newWindow(WindowType.WINDOW);

That’s it for now. I’ll deep dive into new Selenium Grid features in an upcoming post.

Closing note

These features are in alpha release and subject to change in future. Please use with caution. You can find the complete code example from this post in my GitHub repo https://github.com/upgundecha/selenium4

Gherkin Dialects

One of the core principles of Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) is having meaningful conversations to describe the behaviour of the software with concrete examples.

…having conversations are more important than capturing conversations is more important than automating conversations. – Liz Keogh

BDD practitioners have a choice to select a language that is commonly used and understood by the team to describe the behaviour of the software.

Gherkin, the ubiquitous language used by BDD practitioners to describe the behaviour of software, has been translated to over 70 languages.

In order to allow Gherkin to be written in a number of languages, the keywords such as Feature, BackgroundScenario, Scenario OutlineGiven, When, Then, And, But, Examples have been translated into multiple languages.  Find more about the languages supported by Gherkin and keywords translated in these languages at https://cucumber.io/docs/gherkin/reference/#overview

Some of these keywords have more than one translation to improve readability and flow.

Let’s take a personal loan calculator application. The feature and scenario for this software are described in the English language as below:

feature_en

Now, let’s translate the behaviour of a personal loan calculator in Hindi (one of my native languages)

feature

Automating conversations with Cucumber

Cucumber framework, the widely used tool by BDD practitioners supports Gherkin dialects.

# language: header on the first line of a feature file tells Cucumber what spoken language to use.

To automate this feature and scenario, Cucumber will generate step definitions in the selected language. In this example, it uses Hindi as shown in below code:

code.png

Both Cucumber and Java support internationalization and this example is automated with Selenium WebDriver, navigating to the Hindi version of the personal loan calculator and checking the behaviour of the software.

Along with Java, the Gherkin dialect (i18N) support is available in supporting programming languages such as Ruby, Python, Go, DotNet, etc.

The working example is available in GitHub Repo https://github.com/upgundecha/cucumber-gherkin-hindi

 

Selenium4 Relative Locators

Selenium 4 alpha-3 is released yesterday with much-awaited friendly locators, now called as relative locators. These new locator methods will find elements based on their location relative to other elements, visually!  You can find the desired element or elements by passing withTagName method along with near, above, below, toRight and toLeft methods. These methods take the relative WebElement or By locator as an argument.  The overloaded near method takes the pixel distance as an additional argument. I did a trial run of this cool new feature on a sample app:

In the sample application, to find the input field which is right of the label Hight in Centimeters, we’ll first locate the label using the By.cssSelector method. Next, we will use the located element to find the input field. For this we will call the withTagName method along with rightOf method passing the label WebElement as shown in below snippet:

2019-10-12_14-23-13


WebElement heightLabel = driver.findElement(By.cssSelector("label[for='heightCMS']"));
WebElement heightInput =  driver.findElement(withTagName("input")
        .toRightOf(heightLLabel));

heightInput.sendKeys("181");

We can also chain the relative locator method to narrow down the search as shown in below code to find the input field to enter weight. The weight field is below hight input and right of weight label:

WebElement weightInput =   driver.findElement(withTagName("input")
        .below(heightInput).toRightOf(weightLabel));

You can find the sample code in my GitHub repo https://lnkd.in/fr5rvmh

Selenium uses JavaScript method getBoundingClientRect to find the elements using Relative Locators.

If you want to know more about these new locators and sample usage, find more details in Selenium test base (tests are living documentation)

Closing note

The relative locators should be used wisely when other methods won’t work. The features in alpha releases may change in future releases. Also, these methods may not work well on overlapping elements.

This is not an entirely new concept. There are other tools in both commercial and open-source space offering similar features to locate element based on visual cues.

API Testing with Postman Collections in AWS CodePipeline

This post explains how to setup an AWS CodePipeline to run Postman collections for testing REST APIs using AWS CodeCommit and AWS CodeBuild.

Step 1 – Creating a Git repository with AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit is a version control service hosted by AWS. You can create, manage Git repositories on CodeCommit.

For this project, we will create a new repository named postman-sample from AWS Console > Developer Tools > CodeCommit

Picture1.png

Clone the newly created repository on your computer

Step 2 – Exporting Postman Collection

Next, we need to export the Postman collection so we can run this using newman cli

Picture2.png

Select Collection v2 option from Export Collection dialogue box and click Export

Picture3.png

Save the collection in cloned repository folder from Step 1 above

Creating buildspec file

We need to create a buildspec file to tell AWS CodeBuild how we want to run the collection. Before running the collection we need to install newman npm package in pre_build phase and then call newman cli with the collection we want to run in the build phase. We can also specify report options to generate HTML file at the end. We will upload this file to S3 after CodeBuild executes the collection:

Picture5.png

Commit & Push the collection and buildspec file to CodeCommit in master branch

You can find the collection and buildspec file used for this example at https://github.com/upgundecha/postman-sample

Step 3 – Creating an S3 Bucket to save report

Let’s create an S3 bucket to save the report file generated by the newman. We can use this file to publish the results.

From AWS Console > Storage > S3 create a new bucket named postmanreport (you will need to use a unique name). You can enable version control on S3 bucket to see historical reports.

Picture6.png

Step 4 – Creating an AWS CodeBuild Project

We will use CodeBuild to fetch the changes from CodeCommit and run the collection using newman. We already have buildspec file which has a sequence for execution.

From AWS Console > Developer Tools > CodeBuild create a project named postman-sample.

Set Source Provider as AWS CodeCommit and Repository as postman-sample:

Picture8.png

We need an environment to run the build job. Let’s configure the Ubuntu/Node.js environment and Artefacts settings as shown in below screenshot:

Picture9.png

Next, we need to configure a Service role. Create a new service role and click Continue

Picture10.png

The CodeBuild project is ready. We can test this project by manually starting the build.

Picture11.png

Step 5 – Bringing it together with AWS CodePipeline

Finally, we need to create a new AWS CodePipleine to trigger the CodeBuild when a new change is pushed to CodeCommit.

From AWS Console > Developer Tools > CodePipeline create a pipeline named postman-sample:

Picture12.pngConfigure the Source Location as AWS CodeCommit as shown in below screenshot:

Picture13.pngConfigure the Build provider as AWS CodeBuild with the CodeBuild project created in Step 4 above as shown in below screenshot:

Picture14.pngWe just want to run tests and stop there for now. We will not deploy anything in this project so we will select No Deployment option in Deploy section as shown in below screenshot:

Picture15.pngFinally, we need to configure AWS Service role as shown in below screenshot:

Picture16.pngThis will take you to IAM to define the new role:

Picture17.pngBack in CodePipeline make sure the role is specified:

Picture18.png

Review the CodePipeline configuration and create the pipeline.

Picture19.png

You will see the Pipeline created success message. You can try invoking the newly created Pipeline by clicking the Release Change button:

Picture20

Once the Pipeline is executed you will see a both Source and Build stages in Green (unless there are any errors) as shown in below screenshot:

Picture21

After a successful run, you can go and check the S3 bucket to view the report.

Picture22.png

Newman generates a nicely formatted report as shown in below screenshot:

Picture23.png

You can also configure a Lambda function or SNS to send a notification along with the report.

Generating Test Data with Faker and friends

During my recent endeavours to build a REST API, I wanted to test the bulk upload feature of the API which required a large set of test data. I was looking for a quick way to create a fake test data set and found an interesting Ruby library called Faker. This a port of Perl’s Data::Faker library.

Faker is a popular choice in Rails community. It is also ported to Java, Python and JavaScript.

Faker provides a number of categories for test data generation. For example Names, Addresses, Pictures, Business & Finance (Credit Card Numbers, IBAN numbers, Swift Codes etc.), Text placeholders and much more.

Let’s say we want to create a list of records on the fly. We want a list of names and contact phone number. In Ruby, all we would have to do is:

First install Faker Gem with:


gem install faker

and create a simple script to generate records:


require 'faker'
require 'json'

landlords = []

100.times do
  landlord = Hash.new
  landlord["name"] = Faker::Name.name
  landlord["contact_number"] = Faker::PhoneNumber.cell_phone
  landlords.push(landlord)
end

puts JSON.pretty_generate(landlords)

This will create records similar to below output. You can copy or store the output and use it seed to database or during the testing


[
  {
    "name": "Ms. Adelia Ortiz",
    "contact_number": "1-443-107-3897"
  },
  {
    "name": "Delores Cassin",
    "contact_number": "868.775.6054"
  },
  {
    "name": "Rose Klocko",
    "contact_number": "759-090-9777"
  },
  {
    "name": "Josiah Langworth I",
    "contact_number": "1-308-497-4606"
  },
  {
    "name": "Kattie Hamill",
    "contact_number": "266-980-1233"
  },
]

We can also use Faker in automated tests. For example here’s Capybara test using a fake user data to test Sign-Up feature:


name = Faker::Name.name
email =  Faker::Internet.email

visit("/signup")

fill_in('account_name', with: name)
fill_in('account_email', with: email)
click_button('Sign Up')

page.has_content?("Dear ${name}")
page.has_content?('Verify Your Email Address')

Here’s JavaScript version of the Ruby script made with Faker.js


var faker = require('faker')

landlords = []
for(i=0; i<100; i++) {
  var user = {
    name: faker.name.findName(),
    email: faker.phone.phoneNumber(),
  };
  landlords.push(user)
}

console.log(landlords);

By default, these libraries generate values which may not be unique. However, you can set options to generate unique values. You can also extend/customise the output.

You can find Java port of the Faker called Java Faker  Here’s an example using Java Faker for Registration Test

package com.example;

import com.github.javafaker.Faker;
import org.junit.Assert;
import org.openqa.selenium.By;
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
import org.testng.annotations.Test;

public class RegisterANewUser extends BaseTest {

    WebDriver driver;
    Faker faker;

    @Test
    public void shouldRegisterAUser() {

        driver = getDriver();
        faker = new Faker();

        String name = faker.name().fullName();
        String company = faker.company().name();
        String email = faker.internet().emailAddress();

        driver.get("http://www.blazedemo.com/register");

        driver.findElement(By.id("name"))
                .sendKeys(name);

        driver.findElement(By.id("company"))
                .sendKeys(company);

        driver.findElement(By.id("email"))
                .sendKeys(email);

        driver.findElement(By.id("password"))
                .sendKeys("p@assword");

        driver.findElement(By.id("password-confirm"))
                .sendKeys("p@assword");

        driver.findElement(By.className("btn")).click();

        String userNameLabelText =
                driver.findElement(By.className("dropdown-toggle")).getText();

        Assert.assertEquals(name, userNameLabelText);
        Assert.assertTrue(driver.getPageSource().contains("Dashboard"));
        Assert.assertTrue(driver.getPageSource().contains("You are logged in!"));
    }
}

There is also Python port available at https://github.com/joke2k/faker

Faker and friends are must have power tool for Developers and testers.

Automated Acceptance testing for Mainframe with Cucumber and Jagacy

 

fullsizerender-1I often get questions around Mainframe Automation using Selenium. However Selenium automates browsers, that’s it! Selenium does not automate Mainframe Green screens, and it’s completely different technology.

Automating Mainframe Green screen is primarily needed to test front to back scenarios in complex transaction processing systems with Web and Mobile integration.

There are tools available that can be used to automate Mainframe Green screen interaction. In this post, we will see how to use Jagacy3270 from Jagacy Software along with Cucumber for writing Automated Acceptance Tests on Mainframe Green Screens also known as CICS interface.

About Jagacy3270

Jagacy3270 is a 3270 screen-scraping library written entirely in Java. As described on Jagacy product website it supports SSL, TN3270E, Internationalization, and over thirty languages. This library can be used to create highly reliable and faster screen-scraping applications. However, this tool comes with a cost and details are available on the website.

We can use this same screen-scraping capability to create automated tests on Mainframe Green screens.

Jagacy provides Session3270 class through which we can connect to a Mainframe host and read or write to screens to perform actions.

Writing Automated Acceptance Tests for Green Screens

We can use Jagacy along with testing frameworks like Cucumber in Agile Software development to automate acceptance criteria for Mainframe user stories involving Green screen interaction. These tests can be integrated into CI/CD pipeline and run in headless mode (Jagacy provides an Emulator screen mode or headless mode).

In this post, we will use a Mainframe host used in Jagacy examples to create a simple Automated Acceptance test for a Phonebook application. Here is our example user story

As I university mainframe user
I should be able to search faculty members in Phonebook
So I can contact them for help

Here is Feature file with one of the acceptance criteria or scenario that searches for Faculty phone number on Phonebook application:

Feature: Phonebook

  As I university mainframe user
  I should be able to search faculty members in Phonebook
  So I can contact them for help

  Scenario: Search faculty phone number using name
    Given I start a new emulator session
    When I open phonbook application
    And search for faculty name "NAME"
    Then I should see the results matching with my search criteria
      |NAME1              111-111-1111  LIBRARIES                    5000|
      |NAME2             UNAVAILABLE  MARY KAY O'CONNOR PROCESS    3122|

To automate Screen entry and retrieve values, we need to use screen coordinates by using Row and Column numbers (Typically 3270 sessions are 24×80 rows and columns long).

We can use PageObject Pattern to abstract Mainframe Green screens and provide screen actions and state to tests. For example, here is HomeScreen object which provides feature on the Home Screen:

package com.example.screens;

import com.example.Fields.EntryField;
import com.example.session.Session;
import com.example.Fields.LabelField;
import com.jagacy.Key;
import com.jagacy.util.JagacyException;

/**
 * Created by upgundecha on 14/10/16.
 */
public class HomeScreen {

    private Session session;
    private String screenCrc = "0xb0c10358";

    // Screen fields
    private LabelField waitForLabel =
            new LabelField(17, 6, "TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY");
    private EntryField applicationEntryField = new EntryField(23, 1);

    public HomeScreen(final Session s) throws JagacyException {
        this.session = s;
        if (!session.waitForTextLabel(waitForLabel)) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Not Home screen!");
        }

        if (session.getCrc32() != Long.decode(screenCrc)) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Home Screen has been changed!");
        }
    }

    /**
     * Open Phonbook Menu screen.
     * @return Phonbook Menu Screen
     * @throws JagacyException JagacyException
     */
    public final PhonbookMenuScreen openPhonbook() throws JagacyException {
        session.setEntryFieldValue(applicationEntryField, "PHONBOOK");
        session.writeKey(Key.ENTER);
        session.waitForChange(10000);
        return new PhonbookMenuScreen(session);
    }
}

We can check if a correct page is displayed in the emulator by using the arbitrary text displayed on the screen. We can also use CRC of the screen to make sure it is not updated otherwise tests might fail as fields or text values on screen are not found at specified locations.

Finally, we will call the PageObjects in step definitions to perform the scenario and validate the output:

package com.example.test;

import com.example.screens.HomeScreen;
import com.example.screens.PhonbookMenuScreen;
import com.example.screens.PhonbookSearchScreen;
import com.example.session.Session;
import com.jagacy.util.JagacyException;
import cucumber.api.Scenario;
import cucumber.api.java.After;
import cucumber.api.java.Before;
import cucumber.api.java.en.Given;
import cucumber.api.java.en.Then;
import cucumber.api.java.en.When;

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import java.util.List;


/**
 * Created by upgundecha on 14/10/16.
 */
public class Stepdefs {

    private Session session;
    private HomeScreen homeScreen;
    private PhonbookMenuScreen phonbookMenuScreen;
    private PhonbookSearchScreen phonbookSearchScreen;
    private Scenario scenario;

    @Before
    public void setUp(Scenario scenario){
        this.scenario = scenario;
    }

    @Given("^I start a new emulator session$")
    public void i_start_a_new_emulator_session() throws Throwable {

        session = new Session("test");
        session.open();

    }

    @When("^I open phonbook application$")
    public void i_open_phonbook_application() throws Throwable {

        homeScreen = new HomeScreen(session);
        scenario.embed(session.getScreenshot(), "image/png");
        phonbookMenuScreen = homeScreen.openPhonbook();

    }

    @When("^search for faculty name \"([^\"]*)\"$")
    public void search_for_faculty_name(String q) throws Throwable {

        scenario.embed(session.getScreenshot(), "image/png");
        phonbookSearchScreen = phonbookMenuScreen.openFacultyStaffListing();
        phonbookSearchScreen.searchByFirstOrMiddleName(q);

    }

    @Then("^I should see the results matching with my search criteria$")
    public void i_should_see_the_results_matching_with_my_search_criteria(List<String> records) throws Throwable {

        scenario.embed(session.getScreenshot(), "image/png");
        assertEquals(records, phonbookSearchScreen.getResults());

    }

    @After
    public void tearDown() throws JagacyException {
        session.close();
    }
}

We can also get the screenshot (not available as part of Jagacy API) embedded in the reports.

And if you already have a well established Selenium framework (on JVM) and want to automate Mainframe Green screens, you can use above approach with Cucumber or any other xUnit testing framework that you might be using.

The complete source code for this post is available here. Please drop me a message for access with your Github username. I have built this simple framework on top of Jagacy API. If you need any further information or have suggestions, please do reach out to me.

Setting up minimal Selenium Grid with Docker

Here’s simple guide to setup a minimal Selenium Grid with Docker. For running Docker on your machine you will need Docker toolbox installed from https://www.docker.com/products/docker-toolbox. Below steps are done on a Mac.

We will use Hub and Node images from Selenium project hosted at Docker Hub https://hub.docker.com/r/selenium/

Next we need to create a docker-compose file describing how we want to run the Selenium Grid Hub and connect nodes to the Hub. In this example we will launch a multi-container setup with a Hub connected to Firefox and Chrome nodes:

If you don’t have Docker running, then start the Docker daemon with default machine by using following command:

docker-machine start default

To connect to the Docker shell run following command:

docker-machine env

and then:

eval $(docker-machine env)

This will connect the terminal session to the Docker shell

Finally run the docker-compose command from the directory where docker-compose.yml file is stored:

docker-compose up

This will get required images from the Docker hub and launch the Hub node followed by Firefox and Chrome nodes which will be registered to the Hub. Now we have a minimal Selenium Grid up and running. We can point Selenium tests to this Grid for execution. In the next post we’ll see some advanced options and integration with Maven and Cloud tools.